The we should not fear. Death is

The experience of death creates a spill of emotions that has influenced numerous writers’ works. Death was a popular topic for two American writers Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman.  Dickinson and Whitman were two innovative poets from the 19th century, that abandoned the rules and introduced new, freer styles of writing to poetry at the time. Though Whitman and Dickinson both wrote about similar ideas in their works each has a unique approach to expression in their writings. Both poets have depicted death in their poetry as a relief from this world or escape to a better place. They have defined death as a positive experience yet an experience with great uncertainty. Emily Dickinson in her poem “591” or “I heard a Fly buzz – when I died” portrays death as moment of tranquility that allows for appreciation of the small commodities in life. The speaker begins this poem by taking in the minute features about their surroundings while on the verge of death. The speaker focuses on the stillness in the room and refers to it as “…Stillness in the Air – Between the Heaves of Storm.” Dickinson suggests that in the final moments of life, one will find peace in the smallest objects, such as the stillness of air or the buzzing of a fly. Death in Dickinson’s eyes is a freedom from this world with contains pain and suffering. The speaker is in a state of tranquility and is ready to die. The speaker has cut her attachments to this world: “I willed my Keepsakes – Signed away What portion of me be Assignable” and anticipates death. As the speaker’s life and the poem ends, the fly flies between those gathered around the speaker and light shining through the window. As the speaker notices the light from the windows fade, they realizes that they are dead. Dickinson conveys death as a element of existence that all humans must face and an experience we should not fear. Death is a time of serenity in which one should appreciate their surrounding and life.