Sectors industry is exhilarating, largely because each

Sectors of the Media Industry

            The media is made up of diverse sectors, with graduate careers on
offer in areas such as advertising, journalism, the film industry, broadcast
and television as well as publishing. In
Singapore, each sector offer unique
opportunities and the best route into these roles require a good degree
alongside with some practical work experience. Graduate entry roles are often
at assistant level and include jobs such as runner, media researcher, production
assistant and editorial assistant (Mason, 2017).

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Singapore,
being strategically located in Asia, has become the natural home and
springboard to other parts of Asia for some of the world’s most established
global media companies. They include AXN, BBC, CNBC Asia, Discovery Asia,
FremantleMedia Enterprises, HBO Asia, MTV Asia, Nickelodeon and Walt Disney
Television (IMDA, 2017).

 

Working in the Media Industry

Having
my internship and working freelance in Han Productions for ten months, I have
learnt that freelance work and short contracts to be commonplace throughout the
sector. Also, production consists of long and exhausting hours. Nevertheless, the
experience of working behind the camera is exhilarating. The people makes you
look forward to coming to work each day. As the sociable working environment is
home to many passionate and energetic extroverts, when things are stressful, I
can work with a smile as they are consistently funny and articulate.

To
add on, working in the broadcast industry is exhilarating, largely because each
day presents new tasks and challenges. There is never an opportunity to get bored
as television production is really reactive. As stated by an industry expert, ‘The
nature of the business means that things can change at the very last minute, or
that you suddenly need to reorganise everything about a programme in what seems
like nowhere near enough time’ (Claeys-Jackson, 2015). Therefore, if I were to
choose a sector in which I would like to build my career on, it will be in
broadcast or the film industry.

 

Getting into the Media Industry

            Embarking on a course in broadcast is
intimidating. Career paths are obscure and competition is fierce.  To succeed, you will need commitment,
perseverance and hard work. Working from the bottom up, runner jobs are often
the first step in a TV career. You are able to understand all the different
layers of production this way (Whitmell, 2013).

As
a runner, you work as a production assistant under the direction of the producer
and other production staff. You have to ensure the smooth running of the
production process by undertaking whatever basic tasks required such as fetching
of equipment and helping to set up a location for shoot. This role offers the
opportunity to gain vital experience and knowledge of the production process,
offering valuable networking opportunities, and is often seen as the first step
on the ladder for people aspiring to roles in broadcasting media. Getting a
position as a runner is often a combination of luck, timing and networking. The
industry looks favourably on you if you have experience and contacts, rather
than qualifications. (AGCAS, 2017).

Talking
about contacts, studying in film school since polytechnic years and actively
involve myself in film making interest groups benefitted a lot in assembling a
number of connections in the industry. Associates ranging from bosses and
producers of production companies like Infidow Pictures, The Humming Bird Co.
and Hijrah Filem Production open the door to a variety of job opportunities. However,
working in small independent production companies as mentioned does not provide
further professional development and career progression as appointments are
stagnant. In a long run, I will enjoy better working in established global
media companies. 602

 

Choosing the Right Job

The
way employers hire has changed over the last decade. No one has a steady job
any more as it is more about freelance (Green, 2008). Employers look for people
who are prepared to start by making tea before they move up. Most graduates
expect to come in as junior editors but it does not work that way as you need
to learn from other people and work your way up (Morgan, 2008). Hence,